The Best Gaming PC Build for under $1,000 [2016 Edition]

The Best Gaming PC Build for under $1,000 [2016 Edition]

So, you want a gaming PC? The goal of this guide is to build the best PC possible for gaming with a $1,000 budget. Not only will this system be great for gaming but also almost any other task (streaming, graphics design, video editing, etc).

The Build

CPU:  Intel Core i5-6500  [$205]

This is the heart of your system and you want something fast. Intel i5 is the way to go for a gaming PC. You may be tempted by an i7 but it is not necessary here.

Motherboard: ASRock Z170 Pro4S  [$110]

A great value motherboard. Don’t get tricked into spending $250, $300+ on a motherboard here, it will not result in any additional performance.

RAM:  G.SKILL 16GB (2 x 8GB) Ripjaws DDR4-2400  [$75]

The key here is to just get DDR4-2400, the brand does not matter that much. G.Skill is known however for being reliable and a great value.

SSD:  Samsung 250GB 850 EVO  [$87]

Including an SSD in your build is one of the single best things you can do. While not necessary (you could just run off the HDD), it will really speed up the feel of your system in everyday use as well as decrease load times in game. Use the SSD for your operating system and your game installs. Leave documents, media, and storage to the HDD that follows.

HDD:  Western Digital Blue 1TB  [$55]

When shopping for a Hard Drive (HDD) look for one that spins at 7200RPM and one that operates on SATA 6.0GB/s. Western Digital, Seagate, Toshiba, etc are all fine here. Since your OS and game files will be on your SSD, this will just be used to store your documents, media like music and videos, and any other storage needs.

GPU:  EVGA GTX970 4GB  [$315]

The GPU is going to have a big impact on your gaming performance. Don’t cheap out here. The better your GPU, the higher FPS you will achieve in game as well as being able to turn up the graphics quality settings (yumm… eye candy). When looking for a GTX970, you will see many different brands. Essentially, they are all the same with slight differences having to do with MFR warranty and cooler designs. PNY, EGVA, ASUS, MSI, etc are all fine.

See the rest of the build and total price after the break.

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How to Install OpenVPN on a VPS

How to install OpenVPN on a VPS

In this guide we will be installing ‘OpenVPN Access Server’ onto a VPS.

1. Get a VPS

You are going to need a VPS with full root access. You can get one here.

In our guide we will be using a 512MB VPS running ‘Ubuntu 14 64bit’ as our operating system. If you choose to use a different operating system, the commands in the “Installation” section will be slightly different.

1. Prepare the server

Connect to your VPS using SSH.

Make sure that TUN/TAP is enabled on your VPS. With some providers, you can enable this feature directly in the Server Control Panel with a single click. Just allow time for the VPS to reboot with the new feature enabled. Then, run the following command:

cat /dev/net/tun

If you get a result that looks like this:

/dev/net/tun: File descriptor in bad state

You are all set. “File descriptor in bad state” tells you that TUN is enabled. If you get a different result, TUN may not be enabled on your VPS. Try again or contact your provider so they can check.

Now, lets make sure that iptables is running on your server:

iptables --list

It should be running already by default, however if for some reason you get an error or not found result back, you can try installing iptables manually:

apt-get install iptables

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How to Setup a SeedBox

How to setup a SeedBox on a linux VPS

In this guide we will be setting up a SeedBox (for BitTorrent downloading) on a Linux VPS in just four easy steps.

1. Get a VPS

First, you will need to get a VPS (virtual private server) to host your SeedBox.

In this guide we will be using a SecuredSpeed VPS (their 512MB plan specifically) however, this guide should work with any good VPS provider. Our VPS comes with a dedicated IP, 20GB of storage space (plenty to download even a large 1080p video), and a fast gigabit network connection for under $5/month.

We will be running Ubuntu as our VPS operating system (the script below was written to work with Ubuntu or Debian). Once your order is placed and paid for, you should get an email from your VPS provider with your server login details (specifically your Dedicated IP and initial root password). Make a note of these details.

2. Setup your VPS

Before we can start our VPS setup, we need to connect to our VPS via the SSH protocol so that we can control it and enter commands.

Grab an SSH client like PuTTY (direct download link for Windows here). If you’re running MacOS or Linux on your local system you don’t need an SSH client like PuTTY, you can just connect to your VPS using terminal:

ssh [email protected]

If you are using PuTTY to connect, just plug in your dedicated IP, port 22, and click open/connect. You will then be asked for your username (use ‘root’) and your password (use the root password that you got from your VPS provider).

Now that we are connected to the VPS, we can grab and run our VPS SeedBox setup script:

wget --no-check-certificate https://github.com/bariscimen/transmission-installer/raw/master/transmission.sh && sudo bash transmission.sh

The script will ask you where you for a username and password as well as locations for where you want the downloaded files to go.

Let the script run until it is finished.

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The Best Gaming PC Build for under $1,000 [2014 Edition]

The Best Gaming PC Build for under $1,000

The goal of this guide is to build the best PC possible for gaming with a $1,000 budget. Not only will this system be great for gaming but also almost any other task.

The Build

CPU:  Intel i5-4670  [$210]

This is the heart of your system and you want something fast. Intel i5 is the way to go for a gaming PC. Consider the K version if you want additional overclocking ability. If you can grab the K version for the same price or less, do it.

Motherboard: ASRock Extreme4 Z87  [$145]

A great value motherboard. Don’t get tricked into spending $250, $300+ here, it will not result in any additional performance.

RAM:  G.Skill 16GB (4x4GB) DDR3-1600  [$150]

The key here is to just get DDR3-1600, the brand does not matter that much. G.Skill is known however for being reliable and a great value.

HDD:  Seagate Barracuda 1TB  [$55]

If you go with an traditional Hard Drive (HDD) make sure you get one that spins at 7200RPM and one that operates on SATA 6.0GB/s. Slower models are for energy savings and reduce system performance; not for gaming. See the SSD upgrade option below.

GPU:  PNY Nvidia GTX760  [$240]

The GPU is going to have a big impact on your gaming performance. Don’t cheap out here. The better your GPU, the higher FPS you will achieve in game as well as being able to turn up the graphics quality settings (yumm… eye candy). When looking for a GTX760, you will see many different brands. Essentially, they are all the same with slight differences having to do with MFR warranty and cooler designs. PNY, EGVA, ASUS, MSI, etc are all fine.

See the rest of the build and total price after the break.

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Virtuozzo/OpenVZ vzctl Commands

Useful vzctl commands for your server:

List all VM’s

vzlist -a

Shutdown a specific VM

vzctl stop CTID

Shutdown all VM’s on a node

for ctid in 'vzlist -Ho ctid'; do vzctl stop $ctid; done

Boot a specific VM

vzctl start CTID

Boot all VM’s on a node

for ctid in 'vzlist -Ho ctid'; do vzctl start $ctid; done

Restart a specific VM

vzctl restart CTID

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Build an HTPC on the Cheap for Under $250

Build an HTPC on the Cheap for Under $250

So you want a HTPC (Home Theater PC/Media Center) but you are not Mr. Money Bags? It’s okay; you can still build yourself a great HTPC.

The goal of this build was to play HD content streamed over the network to an HDTV.

The requirements:

1. Powerful enough to handle 1080p Bluray rips.
2. Fairly compact.
3. Fairly quiet.
4. Inexpensive.

The Parts

Barebone System: Foxconn R10-G3  [$80]

This kit comes with a HTPC case, 250W PSU, and a LGA775 Motherboard.

This barebone system is a great value. The motherboard has a gigabit ethernet port (what you want to stream HD content over a network) and 6 Channel S/PDIF audio out. It also comes with 2 SATA cables. The build quality is quite nice.

CPU: Intel Celeron Dual-Core E3300  [$53]

I chose this CPU because it’s LGA775 to match our motherboard socket, powerful enough to handle 1080p Bluray rips, and inexpensive. Consider an E3400 as well.

Video: PowerColor HD3450 Low Profile  [$30]

The integrated graphics solution on the motherboard was weak and only offered a VGA output. Any modern low profile GPU with HDMI out will do (It needs to be low profile already or come with a low profile bracket to fit in the case). This one was not only cheap but had the benefit of being silent (no fan, just a heat sink). Check out ATI 3450’s, ATI 5450’s and Nvidia 8400’s.

RAM: G.Skill 2GB DDR2-800  [$30]

2GB of ram is the perfect amount for a system like this. If you find a deal on a 4GB stick then go for it. Note: the mobo only has a single ram slot.

See the rest of the build and the final price after the break.

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